New Flu Information for 2016-2017

Getting an annual flu vaccine is the first and best way to protect yourself and your family from the flu. Flu vaccination can reduce flu illnesses, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school due to flu, as well as prevent flu-related hospitalizations. The more people who get vaccinated, the more people will be protected from flu, including older people, very young children, pregnant women and people with certain health conditions who are more vulnerable to serious flu complications. This page summarizes information for the 2016-2017 flu season.
What’s new this flu season? A few things are new this season: Only injectable flu shots are recommended for use this season. Flu vaccines have been updated to better match circulating viruses. There will be some new vaccines on the market this season. The recommendations for vaccination of people with egg allergies have changed. What flu vaccines are recommended this season? This season, only injectable flu vaccines (flu shots) should be used. Some flu shots protect against three flu viruses and some protect against four flu viruses. Options this season include: Standard dose flu shots. Most are given into the muscle (usually with a needle, but one can be given to some people with a jet injector). One is given into the skin. A high-dose shot for older people. A shot made with adjuvant for older people. A shot made with virus grown in cell culture. A shot made using a vaccine production technology (recombinant vaccine) that does not require the use of flu virus. Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) – or the nasal spray vaccine – is not recommended for use during the 2016-2017 season because of concerns about its effectiveness.